Limerick competition: Penguins Stopped Play

With the World Cup mere days away from starting proper, it’s definitely time I flung you some freebies. Four copies of Harry Thompson’s excellent Penguins Stopped Play: Eleven Cricketers Take on the World and, a month in advance of any shop, it’s in paperback. How fortunate you all are to read this blog. Many thanks to James Spackman and the good folk of John Murray.

It’s limerick time!

Your starter for five is either:

1) West Indies are hosting the Cup

2) They say the World Cup is wide open

We’ve run a few limerick competitions in the past which have gone down well. For those not sure of the style a limerick takes, it’s really simple: using one of the two starting lines below, construct a five-line verse with the rhyme scheme of aabba. See here for ideas. Or here.

Get to it. And don’t forget, if you don’t win, snag a copy from the shops.

Competition: win signed copies of Arm-ball to Zooter

Arm-ball to Zooter: A Sideways Look at the Language of Cricket

Got quite a few books piling up here so it’s time for a competition. I have two copies of Arm-ball to Zooter – still warm from the oven – the new book from The Guardian’s Lawrence Booth. A fine writer and allround good egg, Lawrence has even agreed to sign the books, thereby raising its antique value by several thousand percent.

Joking aside it’s a terrific read, as you would expect, and well worth the mere £7.79 from Amazon. So treat yourself to a new book – one which, thankfully, isn’t an autobiography from a veteran international batsman of 14 months…

Competition

We’ve run a few limerick competitions in the past which have gone down well. For those not sure of the style a limerick takes, it’s really simple: using one of the two starting lines below, construct a five-line verse with the rhyme scheme of aabba. See here for ideas.

So, use either of the first lines below and get cracking. Competition will run until I get very bored; keep it cricket-based as much as you can, and the best two will win one of Lawrence’s books.

1) When Flintoff asked Ponting to lunch…

2) At Brisbane one day by the sea…

Another limerick – this time with prizes

OK, have launched a new competition at The Googly, but everyone’s welcome to join from here. And prizes are on offer from the marvellous and terrific people at Crease Clothing. Their T-Shirts are all cricket-related, emblazened with cricketing slogans and puns! Well worth getting a couple for summer even if you don’t win one of the two on offer.

Go! Now! Enter! Make me laugh and win yourself a prize.. NOTE: you need to make your entries at the other blog, not here! Thanks.

Christmas limericks

We haven’t had a limerick for a while – what better time to do one than now! See the rules/tips here. Your starter for ten is the following: It’s Christmas two-thousand-and-five.

Try the 2006 limerick

Cricket Limerick part deux

After the surprising success of the first limerick idea I had, it’s time for a repeat. For rules and regulations, see here – but the concept is simple: use the a a b b a 5-line form, and make it as funny and irreverant as possible. And the first, second and fifth lines generally have eight syllables, hence a limerick’s rhythm. For example:

A flea and a fly in a flue

Were caught, so what could they do?

Said the fly, “Let us flee.”

“Let us fly,” said the flea.

So they flew through a flaw in the flue.

Anon

The starting line this week is: The series resumes at Lahore. Go for it!

Cricket limerick

Right; a challenge for you. I might try and run this as a weekly thing, depending on how good you all are at it. No prizes to offer, obviously, other than your own self-satisfaction and ego massaging.

For those not in the know, and shame on you if so, a limerick is:

A light humorous, nonsensical, or bawdy verse of five anapestic lines usually with the rhyme scheme
aabba.

For example:

There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, ‘It is just as I feared!
Two Owls and a Hen,
Four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard!’

The last words of the first two lines must rhyme, as must the following two – the fifth line must then rhyme with the first two. Easy.

So, this week’s starting line is: So on now to Faisalabad and to get you going, here’s my horrible attempt:

So on now to Faisalabad
Shabbir, Malik have been had
Trescothick’s going home
And he’s not alone
Sausages are good – not bad!

That is truly dreadful. Your turn…